Deliberate Rest

A blog about getting more done by working less

Tag: press (page 1 of 2)

Turns out the German word for management consultant is “Managementberater”

I learned this courtesy of a new article, “Pausen auf der Arbeit: Wie Abschalten die Produktivität erhöht” that talks about Rest and other books.

I think “management berater” is a great description of what we do!

“Bekerja Sebentar tapi Efektif, Kunci Sukses:” REST comes to Indonesia

Perhaps my favorite new example of REST going places on its own: a long article in Indonesian about rest and its importance. (It also name-checks Cal Newport, Anders Ericsson, and a couple other folks.)

It also includes this graphic:

My kids are still high school and college age, but I suspect that seeing them go off and have their own lives feels a little like this.

“I think anyone in any type of creative, scientific, or business field should pick this up:” more reviews of REST

Romance writer Roni Loren (you might know her from her nine-book Loving on the Edge series, or maybe the two-book Pleasure Principle series, or her eight other books, and I’m getting exhausted just writing this) reviews Rest on her blog. She recommends it: “I think anyone in any type of creative, scientific, or business field should pick this up,” which is great to read.

But in keeping with my feeling that utility is just as important as beauty, I really consider THIS to be high praise: “[U]sing a lot of these methods over the last week has resulted in a week of steady writing, hitting my word count every day, and having no stress about it. It’s been fantastic.”

Also, Elyse Romano explains “Why Doing Nothing and Wasting Time Are Actually Good For You.” As she writes, “When we blend deliberate rest with deliberate work, we are smarter, more creative, and happier people.” It’s one of the few articles in D’Marge that doesn’t feature Eastern European lingerie models and doesn’t have an [NSFW] warning in the title. Though it does describe itself as a magazine “for Magnificent Bastards,” a phrase I can only repeat in my mind in George C. Scott’s voice. And some people read Playboy for the interviews.

Finally, Paul Gaffney has a nod to Rest in his Irish News article about the importance of vacation— and the challenge of taking a vacation that’s actually restful, rather than stressful.

Find the time to give it a rest

Tasmanian newspaper The Mercury has a long piece (“Find the time to give it a rest“) about REST and Robert Dessaix’s fine book The Pleasures of Leisure:

Ever since my artist friend Maria La Grue told me she did her best painting while talking on the phone to a friend I’ve been fascinated by the notion of deliberate distraction and the possibility of achieving one thing while doing something else. Of working at something while not working at it.

This is not just the realm of artists or creative people who rely on letting go so their subconscious can take over. Think of the times you’ve tried to recall the name of a movie, find a lost object or solve a thorny problem. How you struggled for ages, racked your brain, strained your memory, only to have the answer come to you when you’d finally stopped trying and given it a rest.

Seemingly, it’s a bit of the brain we know little about but which in this overworked country is occupying the minds of some of our best thinkers. That is, that we operate at our best, most notably as high achievers, when we regard non-work, or downtime, as just as relevant and important as work itself. And that, rather than being in conflict, work and play are inextricably linked.

I confess I’ve never been to Tasmania– I’ve been to Perth on business, and stopped for a day in Sydney on the way home– but the piece makes me curious about what Hobart is like.

But having Rest there is almost as good. It’s always nice to see the book traveling and being read in places you’ve never been. It’s good for books to have lives of their own. Books are very much extensions of ourselves, but they’re also more than that; they reflect their author’s interests (and limitations), but they also can go in directions and places that we don’t anticipate. They’re a bit like children in that respect: yours but not yours to control, and your responsibility consists of making sure that they’re ready for the world when they leave.

“I’ve run through a lot of my life, only to discover that the most successful people get more done when they slow down and rest”

Enjoying the sunshine

Maria Shriver has an excerpt of REST on her Web site on this Memorial Day weekend. As she explains, a respect for leisure and rest

isn’t something I grew up with. In fact, I think it’s fair to say it was scorned upon in my home. If either of my parents saw anyone resting, well let’s just say…no one would have dared to try.

But, I’ve come to realize that resting is of value. It doesn’t mean you are weak or too tired to go on. It doesn’t mean something is wrong with you or that you’re un-American (even if Americans like to think of themselves as the hardest, most competitive and most driven people on the planet).

Resting is important. It’s important for your mind, your body, and your heart. When one rests, one can recharge and refocus. One can dream. One can tap into their creative spirit and into their consciousness. One can be at one with one’s self, with one’s own divinity, and with one’s own purpose and mission.

The truth is, I’ve run through a lot of my life, only to discover that the most successful people get more done when they slow down and rest.

You can read the excerpt here. It’s actually a combination of material from the introduction and chapter titled “Four Hours,” but is blended so seamlessly it looks like the piece was written exactly this way. Anyway, nice job, editors!

REST and the Greater Good Science Center

IMG_7733

The Greater Good Science Center’s Web site has an excerpt from REST about “How Resting More Can Boost Your Productivity:”

Rest has a bad rap in our culture. Most of us think about rest as merely the absence of work—not something valuable in its own right. Sometimes, it’s even equated with laziness.

But nothing could be further from the truth.

The excerpt edits out all the historical case studies, and really foregrounds the science– which is probably just what readers expect from the Center.

Views of, or from, Sather Tower

For me, it offers an interesting view of what the book might have been like if I hadn’t had the history.

It might be more compelling to some readers who are more science-focused, but I still like my version.

REST in Der Tagesspiegel

The German edition of REST (Pause: Tue weniger, erreiche mehr) came out a couple weeks ago, and this weekend Der Tagesspiegel, a Berlin newspaper, ran a length excerpt, complete with illustration.

Article about REST in Der Tagesspiegel

I’m told that in the cartoon, the mother says, “She´s sleeping and sleeping and sleeping…!”. The father replies, “She´s going to be a genius.”

Haven’t seen it online yet, but between this, the great South African review, and a request I just got for an interview with a Dutch media outlet, I’m having an oddly sub-Saharan morning…

“I cannot recommend this book highly enough!”

“I cannot recommend this book highly enough!” South African strategy consultant Ian Mann says in his review of REST on Fin24, a South African business Web site. “It could be life-changing.”

Always nice to have good readers!

The importance of taking rest seriously

“IF LIVING excitedly and hurriedly would only enable us to do more, then there would be some compensation, some excuse, for doing so. But the exact reverse is the case.”

That was the opinion of William James, the philosopher, psychologist and physician, in 1899. I wonder what he would say of our 24/7, always-on world, where the concept of turning off is an anachronism?

Many business people today treat stress and overwork as a badge of honour, and will brag about how little they sleep and how few holidays they take. However, as Dr Soojung-Kim Pang shows, it is a mistake to think of rest as nothing more than the absence of work. Rest is work’s partner that, when correctly understood, improves output exponentially, and the quality of our lives commensurately.

It includes a pretty thorough gloss of the book. If you never actually read the book (which would be a shame), but want to know what it says (which would not be a shame), read this review.

I’m interviewed on local access middle school TV

So in January I was in Munich, being interviewed by Arianna Huffington.

This month, I was interviewed on KMTV Winter Middle School Camp. (My nephew was in the camp, and invited me to be interviewed.)

It was fun. You can watch it in the embed above; my interview starts at 33:40. Or watch it on YouTube.

Just remember: there’s no such thing as a small media request.

On Inside Mastery

I’m a guest on this week’s Inside Mastery podcast, talking with host Martin Soorjoo about REST,  performance, and productivity. You can listen on Soundcloud, or iTunes.

This picture of me on the Inside Mastery Web page is a bit goofy (it’s from an event I did in Los Angeles a few years ago), but the conversation was fun and informative.

And Martin gets some very interesting guests– Two Awesome Hours author Josh Davis, and Sleep author Nick Littlehales, both of whom are really smart, were on earlier episodes– so it’s well worth subscribing to the podcast.

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