I’ve been tweeting about this all week, but it seemed appropriate to save a blog post for the official print publication day. Arianna Huffington reviews REST in today’s New York Times Book Review:

We hear a lot about the many things that are disrupting the American workplace: the decline of manufacturing, demographics, globalization, automation and, especially, technology. And it’s true — all of those are roiling the world of work, not just in America but worldwide.

But there’s another force transforming the way we work, and that is: nonwork. Or, more specifically, what we’re doing in those few hours when we’re not working. With “Rest: Why You Get More Done When You Work Less,” Alex Soojung-Kim Pang superbly illuminates this phenomenon and helps push it along.

I like how within two paragraphs Huffington has enlisted the book in her own project. Actually I mean that sincerely: when someone can see your work as advancing their cause, or useful to them in some way, that’s a good thing!

If work is our national religion, Pang is the philosopher reintegrating our bifurcated selves. As he adeptly shows, not only are work and rest not in opposition, they’re inextricably bound, each enhancing the other. “Work and rest aren’t opposites like black and white or good and evil,” Pang writes. “They’re more like different points on life’s wave.”

It’s actually one of the better summaries of the book. I’m impressed, and of course flattered.

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New York City from Central Park, October 2016

When I was in college I would spend Sunday mornings with my friends in the dorm, having bagels with cream cheese and splitting up the New York Times. So I’m enough of a traditionalist to find actually being reviewed in the Times really exciting.

These last two weeks have been full of radio shows, interviews, finishing articles and writing guest blog posts. This is a lovely cap to all that– or perhaps the start of another, even more intensive round!